Moving Along With Time

I can’t express in words how much I hate moving.

Like, I HATE MOVING.

The whole process of taking everything down in your apartment, packing it all up, transporting all your items to the UHaul, driving the UHaul to your new place, UNLOADING everything from the truck, carrying those items unto your new spot and rearranging everything once you’ve finished bringing everything in the apartment is a struggle from the depths of hell. That may be a bit dramatic, but I don’t care. I spent ALL DAY yesterday moving from my apartment of two years to a new one up the street, mainly because of rising rent prices. Plus, the new one had a better deal overall and was cheaper than what I was paying this past year. And furthermore, my roommate had decided that he was going to move out of our apartment to a house closer to the hospital. Soooo I made the executive decision to endure the struggle of the moving process, even though it’s one of my least favorite things to do. Luckily (or unluckily, depending on your perspective) I don’t own many things, so I was able to start and finish the whole process in one day! So I’m currently all moved in and enjoying my new apartment, which also happens to have a skylight in it! I’m also even closer to downtown Winston-Salem now, so many of the restaurants are within walking distance from me. Only thing missing is a grocery store, which I still gotta hop in a car and drive to when necessary. Closest thing I got to a grocery store is CVS about a block away. Yeah, I wouldn’t wanna grocery shop there either.

But you didn’t click on this link to read about my moving struggles. You clicked to read about how my latest experience in my Internal Medicine clerkship went and what you could possibly take from my experience so far. Or you may have clicked for another reason unbeknownst to me. I don’t care. I’m just glad you’ve taken some time out of your precious day to read what I end up typing on this post. For that, you are much appreciated. I’m grateful for your attention. Thank you!

 dj khaled i appreciate you GIF

As a sidenote, take a listen to that new DJ Khaled album, Grateful, if you haven’t already. It’s 🔥🔥🔥! The album also got me through the hassle of the moving process. Did I already tell you how much I hate moving? My disdain for it is up there on the list next to being ignored. And having insomnia. Insomnia is the absolute worst.

Lol okay, I’m done.

I spent this past week working at an outpatient clinic for the underserved in downtown Winston, where I interacted with an interesting array of patients. During the week, I worked on my history-taking and physical exam skills as well as my patient presentation skills. I also wrote up a few patient notes and was able to get some good feedback on those from my attendings. One interesting aspect of my time in the downtown clinic was participating in this program called CarePlus, where healthcare providers travel to the homes of certain patients to make sure that these patients are getting the care that they need. I was able to ride along with a nurse on one of these trips and was afforded a unique perspective of distributing healthcare as a result. We traveled to three different patient homes, all in places that I wouldn’t have ever ventured to otherwise. By going to these places and experiencing them with my own eyes, I could fully appreciate how much of an effect the environments of these patients had on their overall health and on their respective perspectives of the world. I was already well aware of the types of environments that a vast majority of the underserved population routinely inhabit and of the power that an individual’s environment has on their life. This experience only heightened my awareness of that absolute truth. Overall, my experience in the clinic was a great one! The atmosphere was inclusive, the people that I worked with were very friendly, and I didn’t have to wake up at 4:45 AM each morning. How can you beat that? Plus, I’ve been doing quite well so far in staying disciplined in my studies. I’m seeing a steady increase in my knowledge base and I’m getting better at reasoning through these practice questions. Yes, they’re still hard as hell…but I’m learning a ton from them!

With that said, I gotta get back to them. I took an unexpected (and extended) break from studying this afternoon, but I got free food and good vibes from friends in return! So now that I’ve used up a good portion of my afternoon, it’s time for me to get back to the grind and prepare for my week in hospice care coming up. I have a strong feeling that this is going to be quite an emotional week…

Y’all be sure to have a lovely week! It’s hard to believe that I’m already halfway done with my first rotation of third-year!

“Your life does not get better by chance, it gets better by change.” – Jim Rohn

– Black Man, M.D.

P.S. – R.I.P. to the King of Pop!

Same Building, Different Views.

Happy Fathers’ Day to all of you dedicated and respectable fathers out there adequately taking care of your families!

I was thankfully able to make it home this weekend to not only spend Fathers’ Day with my dad, but to also celebrate my siblings’ graduation from high school as well as to spend some necessary quality time with my family after several tough weeks of dealing with my grandma’s rapidly deteriorating health and eventual passing. I wasn’t able to stay home for long, but the time I spent with everyone was extremely worthwhile and refreshing. I didn’t get much studying done while at home, but I did get a rejuvenating dose of motivation to continue grinding! I also received an unexpected dose of motivation from the Financial Aid office a few days ago, who decided to update me on the amount of money that I currently owe to the government.

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Go ahead and try to guess the amount I’m currently shackled with. Here’s a hint: I currently have a six-digit negative net worth. Let’s just say that with the amount I owe, I could easily purchase a $200,000+ house in a nice surburban area.

LAAAWWWWD.

But it’s all good though, I’m gonna pay it all off in the distant future. No point in worrying about something that I can’t necessarily control for the moment. All I can do is continue learning from my clinical experiences and formulating a foundation of knowledge that I’ll effectively utilize for the rest of my career as a physician.

Speaking of which, I had quite an interesting week in my most recent week as a third-year medical student. I was afforded the opportunity to participate in a week-long collaborative interprofessional practice immersion experience (Walk In Their Shoes “WITS”), where I took on the role of various providers of healthcare and learned about their respective responsibilities on the healthcare team. I was also able to gain valuable insight from these different providers of care and appreciate the various perspectives that they harbored. I ended up taking on the role of seven different healthcare professionals overall! At certain times of the week, you could find me working as a Nurse Assistant, a Speech Therapist, a Bridge Nurse (Nurse Navigator), a member of the Rapid Response Team, a Charge Nurse, a Pharmacist, and a Bedside Nurse.

  • Nurse Assistant: I spent the majority of the morning watching the nurse assistant routinely take vital signs, attending to the patients’ needs and helping clean patients as needed. It was a relatively slow morning so I was able to study a bit as well!
  • Speech Therapist: I assisted with monitoring and testing the swallowing function of various patients. In between seeing patients I ended up learning A TON about this profession from the speech therapist that I was following, who was very enthusiastic about teaching me everything she did! She was also quizzing me constantly in order to make sure I understood what she was saying. It was a very interesting experience!
  • Bridge Nurse (Nurse Navigator): In this role, I observed how these nurses worked to “bridge the gap” for patients as they were getting ready to be discharged from the hospital. They did so by communicating interprofessionally with other folks on the team (social workers, physicians, pharmacists, etc.) with the goals of not only preventing the patients from having to return to the hospital, but to also make sure that they understood what they needed to do once they were officially discharged. This is such a neat and highly necessary concept that I very-much-so believe positively influences the quality of patient care.
  • Rapid Response Team: I spent the afternoon responding to calls from different departments of the hospital and adequately managing the situations that we were informed about. Nothing too crazy happened during my experience, so we were able to have some great conversations with one another during our downtime. The people I worked with on the team, who were all nurses, were extremely laid-back and just simply cool people to be around. I had a blast spending my afternoon with them!
  • Charge Nurse: My morning as a charge nurse was pretty chill overall. I helped monitor a couple of patients and observed the charge nurse manage the other nurses on the floor. She was fun to be around and had a great personality that the rest of the nursing staff thoroughly enjoyed!
  • Pharmacist: As an inpatient pharmacist, I was given a tour around the pharmacy lab as well as the pharmacy “outpatient clinic” located in the hospital. I also learned a great deal about the roles of the different staff members of the pharmacy team in the hospital and observed as the pharmacist gave updates about each patient’s medications. This was a really cool experience!
  • Bedside Nurse: This was my busiest experience all week. We were literally on our feet all morning as we gave scheduled medications to our patients, educated them about various things and attended to each of their specific needs. It was great!

It was so cool to experience each of their perspectives of healthcare and to witness the impact that each of their respective professions had on the quality of patient care. In addition, my already immense respect for nurses only further increased after having worked alongside them all week. From the Nursing Assistants to the Nurse Practitioners, it’s very obvious just how critical the nursing staff as a whole is to maintaining quality patient care.

Now that WITS week is over, I’m spending this upcoming week at an outpatient health clinic. I’m looking forward to not having to wake up at 4:45 AM! If you didn’t already know, the hardest part of third-year so far for me is getting out of bed at ungodly hours of the morning. But I’ve been getting used to it!

Time for me to get a bit of studying in. Make sure to have a wonderful week!

“Do to others as you would have them do to you.” – Luke 6:31

– Black Man, M.D.

Letter to Grandma

Bonjour MamiCo!

I pray that you are resting well, now that your suffering has come to an end. You left us way too soon in such a sudden manner, but we both know that God’s timing is perfect, no matter how imperfect we may percieve it to be. I was excited to come and see you this upcoming weekend because I hadn’t seen you in so long…but now that I’m unable to, I want to dedicate this post to you and tell you what I’ve been up to as of late. I’m sitting here chuckling because you would have no idea how to even read this English that I’m typing — forgive me for not being as fluent in French as you would have liked me to be. If you really wanted to though, you could probably copy and paste this whole post in Google Translate…but then again my younger brother would probably have to show you how to do that lol. I can vividly imagine you yelling his name and him running down the stairs to get to you, only to stare blankly at you in confusion for about a minute as you asked him in French how to work the computer you would be reading this on.

Okay, okay, I’m done rambling.

I just finished my first month of my third-year in medical school! Can you believe that?? I’ve been actively caring for patients for about four weeks now, specifically patients with heart issues my first two weeks and patients with kidney dysfunctions these past two weeks. C’est une bonne chose, n’est-ce pas? It’s already been a month and I’m still here trying to wrap my head around the fact that I’m really part of a team in the hospital working to save lives on a daily basis. If it’s crazy for me to think about where I’m at in my life now, I can’t even begin to imagine what you must be thinking about how much I’ve evolved ever since you first saw pictures of me as a chubby baby with a distinct, golden birthmark streaked across my cheek. Time flies huh?

This past week I had some pretty interesting experiences with several patients greatly varying in ages, who all made it known how appreciative they were of my care. I even found that my presence in one of the rooms of my patients had a calming effect on her and her regularly visiting family member! All I’ve really been doing for my patients is waking them up each morning to ask them how they were and to perform a physical exam before going back to my team to present the patients’ conditions to them as well as to work on my patients’ notes. Then I would go back to my patients later in the day just to chat with them for a bit. It amazed me how much they loved the simple fact that I would go back to check in on them in the afternoon. As a matter of fact, it continues to amaze me, and the things I learn about these people are incredible. Likewise, they’ve all been impressed at how far I’ve come at such a relatively young age.

However, even with all the excitement that comes with caring for patients, it continues to be a struggle to make myself study the material that I need to learn for my first shelf exam in early August. Granted, I’ve gotten creative with my study habits over the past couple weeks and have been able to get some good studying in while at the hospital. But once I get home, my drive plummets. I literally have to force myself to stay awake and work on practice questions for this test that’s sooner than I like to realize. It makes me wonder how in the world the interns and residents make it through the day with energy left to do other things when they get home. They work 10x harder than us medical students, and still have other things that they need to study just like us. I guess I’ll find a way to make it work when I get to that level, just like I’ve found ways to make it work in other scenarios both in the past as well as the present. I’m sure you would tell me to do the same thing, for you’re not one to listen to excuses haha. Compared to what you’ve been through, my struggles pale in comparision!

Now that I just finished my Renal rotation today, I’m heading into my Transitional Care Month. In this month, I’ll be participating in an immersion program called Walk In Their Shoes and will be working with the Geriatrics team in order to help take care of elderly patients. I’ll also be learning how to care for patients in hospice care and I’ll gain some experience working in an outpatient clinic in the city of Winston-Salem. With Walk In Their Shoes this week, I’ll take on the roles of different kinds of health workers in the hospital such as nurses, pharmacists, members of the rapid response team, and speech therapists. This collaborative program was created in order to give us the perspectives of other critical members of the healthcare team and to better appreciate what they do for a living. I’m honestly pretty excited to see how this week turns out!

Alright grandma, that’s all I have to update you with. It’s probably not as exciting as watching my brother and sister graduate from high school, but I hope it’s enough to make you very proud to call me one of your grandchildren. It really sucks that I wasn’t able to talk to you face-to-face one more time, but I’m sure we’ll meet again. When we do meet, I’ll be sure to tell you and the rest of the older generations in our family all the incredible things that your grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren and beyond have accomplished! You all will be so proud of having helped maintained lineages of excellence! The whole family is currently in deep mourning for you, but I pray that we gather the strength to turn this sorrow into a joyous celebration of your life. There is so much more that I wanted to learn about you, but I guess I’ll have to now get these stories from my parents as well as from the huge extended family that you’ve blessed us with. I’m incredibly grateful that I was granted the opportunity to have a memorable relationship with you, for you were my last surviving grandparent. May you forever Rest In Peace MamiCo. Looking forward to catching you on the other side! ❤️❤️❤️

MamiCo and me

Colette Ngantcheu

December 5, 1949 – June 10, 2017

“The greatest legacy one can pass on to one’s children and grandchildren is not money or other material things accumulated in one’s life, but rather a legacy of character and faith.” – Billy Graham

– Black Man, M.D.

Grindin’ With Appreciation

You know, having to be on the wards this morning wasn’t that bad at all. Yes, it was weird having to go to sleep around 9PM on a Saturday night and having to work at the hospital today all the while reminding myself that tomorrow was actually Monday and not Tuesday…

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But having to work a weekend day wasn’t bad at all! It was actually relatively chill, or as “chill” as being on the Renal unit can be I guess. I have absolutely no complaints and I absolutely enjoyed the more intimate atmosphere that I had with the smaller team that I was working with for the day. The interns I worked with this morning even let me go home quite early. However, my concept of a weekend is now a bit discombobulated lol. It now feels like I have “hospital-time” and “free-time” during the week as opposed to “a work-week” and “a weekend”. Thank God I’m actually having a great time while at the hospital and am not dreading spending my days there! The fact that time just continues to fly by while working just proves to me how much I’m loving my experience in third-year so far, even if I’m exhausted by 7:30 PM just about every day and have zero willpower to continue studying. Overall, I just feel very lucky and blessed to be able to love what I’m learning and doing enough to be perfectly okay with going in to work on the weekend.

This past week on the Renal service has really been an interesting one. (I know I’ve probably said that about the last two weeks already but darn it, all of third-year has been interesting so far!) During my second-year, I learned about how renal patients tend to have multiple co-morbidities and how the ones with end-stage renal disease have to rely on dialysis to keep themselves relatively healthy. But it’s one thing to learn about it from PowerPoint slides and another thing to witness these real-life patients with your own eyes. These patients are truly sick with multiple conditions and dialysis is required for many of them to survive. I felt really bad for the patients that I interacted with this past week, but I also got a sense of the strength that these patients possessed in order to battle the multiple conditions that they were afflicted with. I’ve also felt the deep appreciation from a patient who was just grateful that I came in to listen to her talk for an hour. That experience reminded me just how lonely being a patient in the hospital can be and just how appreciative some patients are when someone comes in to spend more than a few minutes with them. With another week in this unit, I’ll be granted the opportunity to continue processing the difficult lives that these patients live as well as the complex care that is necessary to adequately care for this patient population.

Along with learning more about this patient population, I also had the opportunity to observe and perform a few procedures! Yeah, I said it. You read that right. I PERFORMED SOME PROCEDURES! (With supervision of course.) I wasn’t doing brain surgery or anything, but I had a direct, physical impact on patient care for the first time since I started medical school! Well that is if you don’t count physical exam manuevers, because I guess that also qualifies as having a physical impact on patient care. But that ain’t as direct as pulling out vascular catheters from the necks of patients or placing an IV line into someone’s arm! Yeahhh that’s pretty lit, ain’t it? I did pretty well with removing the catheters, but I could use some more practice on placing IV lines though 😅. I also was able to observe a couple of blood draws and a procedure called a thoracentesis, where a doctor works to remove excess fluid from the pleural space surrounding the lungs. Wild, huh?

Alright, I gotta get back to studying/tackling my to-do list now that I have a bit of free time to do so, especially since I’m getting ready to attend an Internal Medicine Clerkship dinner in a couple of hours where I’ll be socializing with other students, faculty and residents working in Internal Medicine. Should be a good time!

Make sure to have a spectacular week!

“You may encounter many defeats, but you must not be defeated. Please remember that your difficulties do not define you. They simply strengthen your ability to overcome.” – Maya Angelou

– Black Man, M.D.

P.S. – I’m trying not to let the ridiculousness currently taking place in the government kill my mood on a daily basis, but it’s getting REALLY hard to helplessly go on about my day while our country is being actively driven to the ground. There’s only so much phone calls can do, especially when your “so-called” representative isn’t even listening to what you have to say.