Back To The Grind

Annnnnd just like that, spring break is over.

oprah-crying.gif

Time to get back to the grind. I may feel refreshed and prepared to start this new block of material waiting ahead for me, but that doesn’t mean that I want to start. I wouldn’t be mad if we were handed another week off from school, but that’s just me. But alas, I’m back from my fun-filled vacation in Miami and have no choice but to accept what’s ahead of me. As I said last week, I have no idea what to expect…which is probably why the school is making us attend a mandatory ‘Intro to Neuroscience’ lecture tomorrow morning. Can’t be mad though because it starts at 10 AM, which is golden.

I have a feeling that Neuroscience will be just as intriguing as it will be difficult, but after over seven months of rafting through the raging waters of med school, I feel that I’ll be ready to tackle just about anything thrown at me. I lowkey wouldn’t be surprised if we start getting flashbacks from the head & neck section of anatomy during this block. I’m moreso excited to learn about the clinical aspects of Neuroscience such as stroke, depression, personality disorders, and anxiety. I’m also looking forward to learning how different drugs interact with the brain and exploring the mechanisms that produce the clinical results that we’re all familiar with. I’ve always been interested in things like that, to the extent where I would go on Wikipedia as a high school/college student and look up all kinds of mechanisms only to find myself completely lost thanks to my then-limited knowledge of the body. So to sum it up, I’m definitely looking forward to what this block has to offer even if it just looks like a hazy mist of uncertainty right now.

Well I don’t have much to say beyond that right now. My previous post was probably my longest post yet, so I don’t feel too bad about cutting this one short. I had an awesome spring break catching up with many old friends, spending time with my girlfriend, appreciating the warmth of South Florida, going to the beach for the first time in in almost ten months, marveling at the palm trees, partying, sleeping, etc, etc, etc. I almost feel like this will be my last spring break since I’ll be getting ready for Step 1 around this time next year…

However as long as I keep the quote below in mind, I feel that I’m gonna be alright.

 

“Never let the future disturb you. You will meet it, if you have to, with the same weapons of reason which today arm you against the present.” – Marcus Aurelius

 

 

– Black Man, M.D.

 

P.S. I have no idea how I ended up on the Wake Forest School of Medicine site, or how this picture was taken…I don’t even remember a camera being in the room 😅

wake ultrasound

 

City Boy in a Country World

Hey.

Guess what?

IT’S SPRING BREAK BYYOTCHHH!!!

And it couldn’t have come at a better time. Okay it actually maybe would have been a bit better if it came a week later, which means it would have then lined up with the spring break of most universities that I know of…but no complaints here. I’ll take what I can get. This week I’m only focused on relaxing, having an unforgettable time down here in Miami, and recharging for the final block of my first year, which starts next week. 😳 I’m honestly feeling a mix of both excitement and astonishment at the same time at the fact that after this next block, it will be summer…meaning that I will officially be a 2nd year medical student. Wow. They say time flies by in medical school….well they weren’t lying. Better yet, it damn near flashes by. I’ve learned so much and although it feels like anatomy was a lifetime ago, it also feels as if I graduated from college last week. I actually still feel like a college kid at times that just happened to make it to the next level by the grace of God. I’ve already accepted that it will take a good while for me to fully mature into more of an adult mentality, so I’m content with happily living out my days as a youngin’.

Now about my Community Practice Experience last week. Lenoir, Lenoir, Lenoir. I’m not even sure where to start. It was definitely an unforgettable experience, to say the least. The clinical exposure I received at the pediatrics clinic was amazing, and I’ll be happy to go back for my second and final week later in October. The nursing staff was fabulous, the doctors were very willing to teach students and the patients were suprisingly overwhelmingly willing to allow me to interview them as well as physically examine them. As for the actual town of Lenoir…..let’s just say that it makes Winston-Salem look like a metropolis. I swear I saw black cows roaming around the front lawn of a house at one point while driving to the clinic. No offense to anyone that loves the countryside but in my opinion, the town looked kind of depressing… and the fact that it rained all throughout my first two days there didn’t help much at all. The rain also showed me the epic driving skills of Lenoir residents. Someone hydroplaned and rear-ended into my rental car at one point, and on another occasion somebody in front of me was really begging to get T-boned by another car. Jeez. (It was a minor dent in my car and I got everything taken care of in regards to insurance. Thank God for Trip Protection. 😊) I also just want to add that one of the officers that helped to take care of the rear-end collision assumed that I was a ball player from Wake. Typical. I politely corrected him and told him that I was actually a medical student that was on a week-long clinical rotation in Lenoir, which really surprised and impressed him. I love the responses I get whenever I completely flip a stereotype on someone. In Lenoir, a highway literally cuts through the town and the roads are typically full of trucks. (I absolutely HATE driving anywhere near trucks.) The town also went nighty-night around 9 PM at the latest and from what I experienced first-hand, there was an amazingly low amount of diversity. As a matter of fact, my classmates/roommates that were placed in Lenoir with me and I walked into a brewery at one point to get some 50-cent wings and to taste some of the local beer there. My group consisted of two Asian guys, an Indian guy, and two black Africans, including me. We literally WERE the diverse element in the brewery that had about 50 people in it at the time. I’m not kidding. Everyone else was white. We got a few stares as we walked in. 😐 It was kind of strange to me because I’ve always been in diverse environments, so being in an environment like that made me slightly uncomfortable. I won’t lie though, those wings were definitely bomb as hell. Plus the waitress served us with some good ol’ southern hospitality, so I had no complaints about that dinner. Also my classmates and I ended up having an interesting convo about race and how people decide to classify themselves/how society pressures all of us to check boxes of race in order to categorize all of us accordingly. It definitely proved to be an interesting conversation. Alas, I can’t talk about the finger-lickin’ wings without talking about the barbeque restaurant we went to a couple days later. My dinner there consisted of pulled pork with barbeque and specially made hot sauce, baked apples, mac & cheese and a roll. It was simply AMAZING. Plus the staff was the definition of southern hospitality. We will definitely be hitting that spot again in October.

In regards to my actual experience in the pediatrics clinic, I’ve really surprised myself on how comfortable I’ve become in obtaining an accurate history. I still tend to miss small things here and there, but I’ve also noticed how often patients conveniently tend to leave out vital information in an interview even after I specifically ask them for it. 😒 By the end of the week, I was literally interviewing every patient that came to the clinic to see my 2nd preceptor. Talk about practice. Backing up to the first couple days of my clinical experience, I quickly saw both the value of the clinic to the community and the closeness of the community as a whole. So many patients came in on a regular basis to maintain their health and the vast majority of them had some kind of relationship with both my first and second preceptors. I thought that it was pretty cool to witness how much the people in the community depended on the expertise of the doctors in the clinic and how vulnerable they were willing to be in order to maintain their quality of life. However, I’m not a doctor, nor do I look like one. So when I started interviewing patients on my first day, I made sure to wipe off the look of surprise on their faces by reassuring them that I wasn’t posing as a doctor or anything and that I was simply there to practice my interviewing skills with them. After that whole spiel, they tended to be more relaxed with me in the room. I also quickly realized how different it was to interview the guardian of a patient that couldn’t talk, like a baby. I had to shift my questions around a bit because I couldn’t ask the patient directly about how he/she felt. That was definitely a new and vital experience for me. My 1st preceptor made sure to ingrain in me that whenever I interview a patient, I should not be merely checking off a checklist. I should be able to walk out of the room understanding who the patient is and how he/she is suffering from their reduced quality of life. He also allowed for me to perform simple physical exam maneuvers on his patients, like the HEENT exam (Head, Eyes, Ears, Neck & Throat) and the respiratory exam. Note to self: Babies HATE having their ears looked into. To add to my unique experience, I saw circumcisions performed for the first time in my life while I was there. That…was….unexpected. My preceptor didn’t even warn me man. He just took the baby into a room with his mother and by the time I realized what was about to happen, it was far too late to brace myself. It looked hella painful. Poor kid.

My 1st preceptor was a pretty cool guy from Canada who bought me lunch and answered my many questions about medicine and the difference between the Canadian and the American healthcare systems. But he had to leave midway through my experience so I got paired up with another preceptor for my last couple of days who had a more grandmotherly approach to interacting with patients. She was very nice and willing to work with me, but she also did not hesitate to work me. She had me interviewing all of her patients and reporting to her their history before we would both walk in and see the patient again. I probably took a medical history of close to 25 patients in those last two days alone. Being exposed to these children so much also meant being exposed to various illnesses. 😰 I was constantly praying that I wouldn’t catch something from any of these kids who came in with illnesses ranging from a common cold to strep throat. Best believe, I was using hand sanitizer religiously and drinking massive amounts of orange juice. I’d be damned if I caught strep as soon as spring break started. There was one occasion where I was interviewing a little black girl and her mother about a condition the girl had. The girl really seemed to like me and was shy, but was also smiling and chirping answers to my questions whenever she wanted to. She was pretty fun to interact with. After that interview, my 2nd preceptor told me that I was a valuable asset to the clinic because she constantly sees little black children come into the clinic who neither have a positive male role model to look up to that looks like them nor has even been exposed to one. I wasn’t really expecting that statement from her at that moment, but it really moved me. Looking back on it, there’s a good chance that this little girl had never seen a black man in a doctor-like role before, and that maybe because of this brief exposure she was able to perhaps subconsciously attribute that she too could grow up to be in a similar role of success. I’m probably stretching it a bit, but it’s real awesome to ponder on.

All in all, I realized how chill the pediatric clinic lifestyle was. It was very low-stress and fun to work in. But just because it was chill didn’t mean that it wasn’t busy. It sure was busy most of the time. And the days were remarkably long. I would be in the office from around 8 AM to around 5:30 PM. That was a struggle to adjust to at first, but I adjusted a bit better as the week went on. Also, I haven’t heard so many babies cry in such a short span of time ever since those communal Cameroonian meetings I used to go to as a kid with my family. Bruh, I heard children screaming in my head as I lay my head to sleep at night on two separate occasions. That’s not normal.

I definitely had a very interesting week in Lenoir. But I was happy to leave in order to start my spring break, and I wasted no time in coming down to Florida to spend it. So with that said, please have a remarkable week!!

The greatest mistake in life is being afraid to make one.

– Black Man, M.D.

Two Blocks Down!

I can breathe.

In this past week, I managed to get through a 100-question test based on everything I’ve learned in the past few weeks as well as a cumulative 166-question test based on everything I’ve learned since Anatomy ended back in November. That’s 266 questions homie. Best part is, only three days separated these two tests apart. That’s 72 hours bih. You know what it feels like to have to go through that many questions in such a short time span? So believe me when I say once again,

I CAN BREATHE!!!

It felt so damn good to walk out of the testing room last Friday knowing that I was done with the CSP block and that I didn’t have to even think about studying for anything for the next two weeks. With my Community Practice Experience (CPE) coming up this week and Spring Break the week after, I’m SO ready to chill out for a while.

With the end of the Cellular & Subcellular Processes block comes the end of the basic sciences curriculum…and the end of the block I was the most knowledgeable about coming into medical school. From here on out, we will be learning about the body in a systems-based approach starting with Neuroscience. Then we will get into other systems next year like cardiology, renal, pulmonology…you get the idea. This style of learning will carry us up until we start studying for our USMLE Step 1 exam next year. Still not quite looking forward to that challenge yet. 😅 To tell the truth, I have NO idea what to expect going into Neuroscience after spring break. It’s definitely going to be a different feel from what I’ve been experiencing so far, but I also think it’s going to be quite interesting as well. Not to say that the material we’ve been learning so far isn’t relevant, but by learning in this new approach I feel that we will be really delving into material that will be very practical to us as practicing physicians in the future. Who knows, maybe I’ll actually begin to feel like a mini-doctor. Ehhh on second thought, maybe not. I’m cool with my minimal responsibilities as a first-year student for now. Ain’t no rush in becoming a doctor.

Now about this CPE I’m undertaking this week…it should be an interesting experience to say the least. As I’ve said in an earlier post, I was placed in Lenoir, NC, which is a pretty small town about 90 minutes west of Winston-Salem. Don’t even bother asking me what’s out there. I was also placed with a pediatrician, so I’ll get the opportunity to work with kids, something that I’m really looking forward to. Christel (sometimes) luhhh the kids! Apart from working with my preceptor and completing assignments, I don’t really know what I’m going to do with whatever free time I’ll have set aside. I guess I could catch up on reading or watching Netflix or even a Ted Talk or two. Maybe I could check the town out and see what Lenoir has to offer. I may just end up not finding much of anything but I’ll give the place a fair shot. Don’t disappoint me Lenoir! On a sidenote, it took me forever to pronounce that town right. I was pronouncing it like it was some fancy French museum at first and after getting laughed at and made fun of, someone else told me that it was pronounced “Lennar”. So I started pronouncing it like that and when I told some of my classmates from NC that I was going to “Lennar” for CPE, they looked at me funny and told me that it was pronounced, “Len-nore”. So Len-nore it is. I personally liked the French-flavored “Lenoir” a lot better; it made it seem like I was going somewhere elegant and foreign.

So all in all, I’m chillin’ for the next couple of weeks and I’m already taking full advantage of my free time. Before I finish up this entry, I wanna give a shout-out to a new blog that’s being created with a great friend of mine that’s also in medical school and her friend that’s an incoming law student. It’s called MD & Esquire and its main purpose is to create a space for students of color looking for information about getting, staying and being in graduate school. It also will serve as an inspirational blog that will work to encourage women of color as they work to pursue a professional career in a field of their choosing. I’m personally looking forward to checking it out and am excited that they’re entering the blogging world in order to inspire others! Here’s the link to MD & Esquire’s Facebook page:

 

I hope you each have an outstanding week and that you work to make the best out of any situation that you may currently be in. Always keep in mind that:

Everything is Energy. Your thoughts begin it, your emotions amplify it, and your actions increase its momentum. 

Stay blessed!

– Black Man, M.D.

 

P.S. Congrats to all the new Iron Arrow members that were tapped into the Tribe this semester back at UM!

Ready For February.

I hope y’all had a great weekend! I know I did 😁. I ended up spending it with a special person, who also came with me dressed hella nice to Wake’s medical school prom. By the way, the prom was a good time, and the open wine bar was a fabulous (and dangerous 😳) addition. So with that plus having a fun time with my girlfriend and Netflix, I ended up doing absolutely nothing productive this weekend. Now that real life has hit me square in the chin once again, I guess I need to take the rest of today to get some work done and to prepare for my third Clinical Practice Assessment Exam (CPX) this week.

Now this clinical skills test (which I’m actually not mentally ready for yet by any means), will be testing us on the same skills that we were tested on last time. That includes taking a proper History of Present Illness, a complete Review of Systems, a Social and Family History, a Past Medical History and vital signs. However, we’re also now going to be taking a Sexual History and a musculoskeletal physical exam. That’s the little game that you play every time you go to the doctor for a checkup, you know, where the doctor tells you to push against his/her hands, tells you not to let him/her bring your arms down, etc. I used to think I was such a Hulk whenever my doctor performed that physical exam on me as a kid. She always had me feeling that I was stronger than I really was…but I digress. This CPX won’t really be bad or anything, I just have to get my mind straight and prepare for it. I did pretty well last time, so if I can repeat that performance, I’ll be fine.

On another note, my whole first-year class has our first Community Practice Experience coming up in a few weeks. This is where we each get paired up with a physician practicing family medicine in different parts of the state (mostly rural areas) and learn first-hand what it’s like to practice as a physician in primary care. The experience lasts about a week and in that week, we’ll be shadowing the doctor and doing whatever tasks he/she needs to be completed. Now I want you to go ahead and guess where I got placed in North Carolina.

Go ahead, I’ll wait.

If you guessed Charlotte, you’d be wrong.

Greensboro? Nahhh.

High Point? Raleigh? Winston-Salem??

Nope, Uh-uh, No.

Try Lenoir. Never heard of it? You and me both. It’s some small town of about 20,000 people that lies about an hour and a half west of Winston-Salem, somewhat close to the Tennessee border. Near the mountains and whatnot. And I thought Winston-Salem was in the middle of nowhere. Lenoir makes Winston-Salem look like a metropolis. Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? Well it is. It should prove to be an interesting experience, that’s for sure. After that week though, we got our Spring Break!

Spring Break is gonna be dope, I just gotta figure out what exactly I’m gonna do and finalize those plans…sooner rather than later. I got DC and Miami in mind…but it all depends on the state of my finances 😅. Speaking of finances, if anyone has several thousand dollars that they’re just DYING to get rid of, feel free to send it my way. I’ll promise I’ll put it to excellent use! Sending a car over to me works too 😄. Haha I’ll take whatever donations I can get.

Before I finish off this entry, I want to share something that was shared with me this weekend. I personally found it pretty encouraging as well as rejuvenating. To sum it up, it’s a short video that features Dr. Curtiss Moore, a cardiology fellow, giving a motivational message about being a Black Man, M.D. (Hehehe I’m clever). Hope it helps you in some sort of way!

Black Men In White Coats – Dr. Curtiss Moore, UT Southwester Medical Center

And finally, I’ve decided to start sharing inspirational messages with you each week. If you didn’t already know, I’m a firm believer in the tremendous value of positive energy. I believe that you can change not only your daily experiences, but your life overall just by changing the way you think. It may sound crazy, but it’s gotten me this far, so why stop now? In the words of one of my old high school friends, “I aspire to inspire.” With that in mind, I would love to help provide some sort of inspiration to someone out there in order to help him/her catalyze a better perspective of life.

Having said all that, today’s positive memo is simple:

Change in your life only comes from a change within yourself.

Stay Blessed!

– Black Man, M.D.