Lessons In The NICU

This week flew by so fast man.

And I’m already at the halfway point of my NICU rotation.

Like, how??

kevin hart jokes GIF by Kevin Hart: What Now?

Between the long hours at the hospital each day and the great learning experiences that I’ve been fortunate enough to enjoy, I guess it’s easy to see why time has seemed to pass by so quickly. My mornings are primarily spent pre-rounding, pre-charting, rounding with Radiology, rounding on patients with my regular team, and finishing my notes. I’ve learned so much about routine care in the NICU just by paying attention to other providers during rounds and keeping up-to-date with my assigned patients. Although I had an idea of what day-to-day patient care looked like, it amazed me just how many calculations need to be done on a daily basis in order to adequately maintain the status of these infants.

After eating whatever I manage to come across for lunch, I typically spend my afternoons checking on my patients, finishing up whatever notes I have left, attending various learning sessions, and/or observing/participating in various procedures. As a matter of fact, my colleague and I actually performed a ventricular tap on an infant who was suffering from brain swelling and increased cranial pressure due to her overproduction of cerebrospinal fluid. The Nurse Practitioner supervising us walked us through the procedure, but we were literally the ones doing it. Can you believe that I actually stuck a needle into the baby’s fontanelle (“soft spot”) so that my partner could draw fluid from her brain? Wild man, just wild. Can’t lie though, it was pretty cool…..until I realized that I had to be immobile with the needle for about 15 minutes as my partner SLOWLY drew the fluid out of the baby’s head at a rate of about 1 mL a minute. We had to draw out 15 mL.

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The little kid took it like a champ though! What a soldier.

I spent part of another afternoon with a Neurologist and a group of third-year med students who were learning how to perform an effective neurological exam on a newborn at the bedside. That ended up being a really good review, and I also learned about the 5 S’s for the first time. Best believe I took notes on that. And speaking of third-years, I got the chance to orient another group of them to their Pediatrics rotation earlier on in the week. Like, I was one of the people giving them tours and tips during their rotation orientation! Talk about having things come full circle!

There were other various afternoon learning sessions that I attended during the week such as lectures on antibiotics and ventilators, interdisciplinary meetings about the next steps for our patients’ care, and my partner’s talk about abdominal wall defects. I even gave my own presentation about the development and usage of the HeRO score in a clinical setting! (The link lets you download my powerpoint, in case you were interested in the topic for whatever reason. It’s pretty interesting, but then again I’m biased. 🤷🏿‍♂️) However, the two sessions that I’ll probably take the most away from were the Medical Improv session and the Brenner Schwartz rounds. The Medical Improv session was actually a fun group activity that took the idea of improvisation and applied it to clinical settings. All the various healthcare providers in the room practiced using affirmative phrases such as “I appreciate you said that” & “yes, and” on each other in order to get an idea of how much more effective conversations can be. We also used negative statements such as “yes, but” and “no” to capture the feelings that patients can get when providers use them without thinking twice about it. We all had a good amount of laughs from the activity, and it made us more aware of the different ways that we can build rapport with patients as well as with our colleagues and other people in general.

The Brenner Schwartz rounds was a multidisciplinary forum that focused on discussing the experiences that various healthcare providers have gone through. There was a panel made up of two nurses and a Neonatologist, all of whom talked about various “best days of their lives” in their careers. It was neat to hear each of their stories and how much of an impact some of their patients have had on their lives and careers. Listening to their stories also motivated me to begin documenting my best experiences with patients so that I can look back on them whenever I’m having a tough day in the future. But then I quickly reminded myself that I have a whole blog to look back on whenever I’m having a tough day lol. But still, having a place where I have my patient encounters documented wouldn’t hurt. There are a good number of experiences that I just haven’t written about, simply because I don’t have the time to write them all out in the manner that I would like to write them out in. But even with that said, I’ve been able to touch on many of my experiences at one point or another in prior posts. Who knows, maybe I’ll end up creating a separate section on the blog dedicated to patient encounters at some point in the future…

That’s all I got for this post! Even though I don’t have to spend my time studying for a Shelf exam, I still managed to find a way to keep myself busier than I would’ve liked to be…so with that said, I’m gonna go and get some work done.

You all be sure to have a spectacular week!

“Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” – Thomas Edison

– Black Man, M.D.

New Expectations

It’s been a chilllll week.

Even with me having to run multiple errands, send various emails, attend a meeting, and mentally prepare for my next rotation, I’ve been having a very relaxing week. As a matter of fact, I haven’t felt this relaxed ever since my post-Step vacation! (a.k.a. right before I started third-year.) I almost didn’t know what to do with all of my extra free time! I ended up doing a lot of reading for pleasure, catching up on a show that I don’t want to admit that I still watch 😂, hanging out with friends, updating sections on the blog (check out the new section if you haven’t already!) and helping my girlfriend move into her new place in Chapel Hill. I stayed in Winston for the first half of my weeklong break and drove over to Chapel Hill early last Thursday, where I still currently am right now. It has been a very restful break and now that I’m re-energized, I’m ready to take on my second clerkship of third-year!

However, being ready to take on my Ob/Gyn clerkship doesn’t mean that I know exactly what to expect. I recieved my clerkship schedule last week and it already seems like it’s going to be vastly different from my Internal Medicine experience. Plus, it’s only a six-week clerkship as opposed to my 12-week IM clerkship…which means that I won’t have anywhere near the amount of time that I had in my previous clerkship to study for my shelf exam. I’ll literally have to start aggressively studying for the Ob/Gyn shelf exam from day one.

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Although I currently don’t have much of an interest in this specialty, I’m looking forward to experiencing what it has to offer and to how my relationships with the patients that I’ll serve will impact both me and them. Because I was pretty interested in the reproductive unit of my second-year coursework, I want to assume that I’ll find some real interest in caring for this patient population as a whole. Also, the thought of me delivering someone’s baby both excites and freaks the hell out of me at the same time! I can only imagine how indescribable that experience will be! But before I get too deep into the clerkship, I have to go through a weeklong orientation that starts tomorrow morning at 7 AM. Thank God, because I definitely wouldn’t feel comfortable performing Pap smears or any other gynecologic procedures on the first couple days of this new experience.

Well, that’s really all I have to say today. I don’t really have anything else that exciting to share with you right now…but I’m positive that these next several weeks will give me more than enough remarkable experiences to tell you about!

Make sure to spread some love this week and to make it an extraordinary one! I know it may be easier said than done in this nightmarish world we’re currently living in, but it’s extremely important that we don’t succumb to the hate that we have been exposed to in alarming doses as of late. It’s okay to get angry and to feel frustrated, but please try your best to not let these hateful acts of terrorism negatively impact you. And finally, play whatever part you can to ensure that this country moves forward in a better direction, regardless of how ineffective, ridiculous, preposterous, insane, and backwards the current administration is.

“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” – George Bernard Shaw

– Black Man, M.D.

 

Summer Vibes

I gotta say, I’m absolutely loving my time off from school so far.

It feels good to be back home in the 757 with friends and family after having to make a pit stop (more like a week-long stop) in Miami to attend two orientations for the program I’m working with this summer. I also randomly ended up at a concluding breakfast for an annual conference for the Association of Black Psychologists soon after arriving in Florida…but that’s besides the point 😅. The orientations I had to attend were spaced out three days apart with the first one being on Monday and the second one being on Friday. How convenient. The one on Friday was very useful and it directly related to the summer program. It got me even more excited to work with the students in the program. Free Dunkin’ Donuts and Panera didn’t hurt either. 😏 I only went to the one on Monday because the university made me. The info given to us in that SIX-HOUR long new-hire orientation session did not relate to me in terms of my summer employment. Being a current medical student and an alumni of the university, I was already familiar with the information that they presented, which ranged from university history to HIPAA, safety procedures and everything in between. Simply put, I really did not need to be there. But alas, I am a mere speck of paint in the spectacular mural that is the University of Miami. I also needed my name to be on summer payroll. So I silently suffered through it with my co-workers.

I guess I should elaborate a bit more on this program I’m working with huh? I’ve name-dropped it a few times but there are a few of you out there that probably aren’t too familiar with it…my bad! As I mentioned in a previous post (Testing My Brain on a Test on the Brain), the program is called the Minority Students In Health Careers Motivation Program, which is run by the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. This seven-week, tuition-free program is one of the three summer programs run by the office with the other two being the High School Careers in Medicine Program and the MCAT Preparation Program. The Motivation program is designed to resemble a “mini” medical school experience where the selected students (ranging from college sophomores to recent college graduates) take a sample of classes such as Anatomy, Biochemistry, Microbiology, & Histology. There is also an opportunity every week to participate in a discussion on a selected topic with a featured speaker while enjoying a free, catered dinner. Not only that, but the students are exposed to Health Equity Research, have the chance to attend supplemental workshops and have the opportunity to shadow physicians every week on clinical rotations. As if all that wasn’t good enough, housing & meals as well as metro transportation between campuses are all free for the selected students! What a program! The overall goal of this program is to promote diversity in the health field by providing students from underrepresented backgrounds an opportunity to develop skills that will increase their competitiveness when it comes time to apply to medical school. As a Teaching Assistant of the program, I’ll work with my co-Teaching Assistant and the Executive Director in facilitating the overall experience of the students in the program. I’ll be in the classroom each day with them and will assist the faculty in executing lectures and activities. I’ll also serve as a useful resource for the students by answering the various questions they will have and I’ll be able to share my experiences in medical school with them. Needless to say, I’m hyped about being able to work with the program!

In between going to the orientations, I won’t lie and say that I wasn’t enjoying my free time. From taking time to continue reading Black Man in a White Coat (I KNOW I’M TAKING FOREVER TO FINISH IT, DON’T JUDGE ME) to chillin’ at the beautiful Venetian pool with some great friends, I’ve been doing a lot of not-studying. It’s been glorious. I’m only gonna continue this period of relaxation, at least until I start the program next week.

I freakin’ love Summer!!!

I definitely can’t close out this post without shouting out the big homie and Doctorate of Education student, Mr. Donovan Livingston, for his incredible graduation speech (#LiftOff) at Harvard last week! You’re a clear example of a positive force and are an inspiration to many bro! I also appreciate you for being a supporter of this blog from the very beginning and keeping up with it weekly! Thanks for being an awesome friend and a great human being in general!!

As you may or may have not noticed, I don’t usually name-drop people in my blog for various reasons…but since he already done broke the internet and all, I figured it wouldn’t be a big deal this time around. If you haven’t heard his speech by now, you can click on the link below to check it out. I know you have five minutes to spare…so go ahead and click on it. You won’t regret it.

 

Have a fun and safe Memorial Day weekend! My appreciation runs deep for all those men and women who have sacrificed their lives to protect this country! Remember that this country stands because of the bravery and courage they exuded!!

Don’t chase people. Be you. Do your own thing and work hard. The right people who belong in your life will come find you and stay. – Will Smith

– Black Man, M.D.